42: What’s for tea?

As we move towards reopening the museum in the autumn we are getting some extra expert help towards setting up our new shop and tea-room.  Consultant Julie Cullen has been advising us on setting up our new tea-room kitchen (not from IKEA this time) and helping prepare possible menus.

The last Bromleys menu we have is this one:

1973-4076

You can see this is after decimalisation, and you could get a cream tea for 29p!  Decimal Day in the UK was on 15 February 1971.  Until that time the pound was made up of 20 shillings each of which was made up of 12 pence, a total of 240 pence. After decimalisation the pound kept its old value and name, and the only changes were to the subunits. The shilling was abolished and the pound was subdivided into 100 “new pence” (abbreviated “p”), each of which was worth 2.4 “old pence” (abbreviated “d”).

In practice this meant that the old shilling could be used alongside the new 5p piece, which was the same size and shape.  Even sixpences (worth 2 1/2p) remained in circulation until June 1980 – I remember paying my 90p bus fare home from school in sixpences as we tried to use them up.

Back to the tea-room.  One of our front-of-house assistants, Jodie, is taking charge of the new tea-room and has been trained up in Food Safety.  We hope to use local produce where possible as well as taking inspiration from the traditional Bromley’s menu and local specialities, while suiting modern-day tastes with salads and good coffee.  Here’s a sneak preview of our first menu ideas.

menus2.jpg

We will need lots more volunteers to help us taking orders, serving customers and even doing a little bit of cooking – if you would like to be part of a friendly team do get in touch by emailing us at museum@northdevon.gov.uk.

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